Any way to train the reviewers to write better reviews?

loops77loops77
edited October 2015 in General
I read some of these reviews, and I can't help but cringe a little. Why are you mentioning what comes with the product? The listing clearly shows it and people know what they bought. Why are you naming the title of the product in the review? Its unnecessary..just give an honest opinion and don't make it sound like an informercial. You don't have to provide 8 to 10 pictures when there are already some in the listing. Just give an honest opinion. If you find that there is a small problem with the product, but you still like it, give it a 4...I don't even mind a 3 as long as you sound realistic and not just writing whatever to complete your review and give 5 stars regardless. Use the substitution test...if the review you write can be used for any other product you get, you have a crappy review.Geez...

Comments

  • Best way to train them is to not pick them to review your products.

    "people know what they bought" go read some one star reviews, many times they don't.
  • loops77loops77
    edited October 2015
    Its not even my reviews I'm complaining about..I'm looking at others. I do think there should be a little "cheat sheet" for how to give decent reviews..should be given to every reviewer that signed up.

    Another thing Im going to complain about..the lack of follow through with reviewers. Got a 30 percent review rate in my last promo.
  • Ouch, I'm sorry.
  • Most sellers appreciate those things included in the review. We have to review the product we received, including what was with our order. It also shows we actually used the product, and didn't review it unopened thus reselling it. I'll admit I do some of the things you have stated you dislike. I've been chosen to review over 280 products in the last 6 months though. I currently have 24 approvals on the site. Before that I had over 40 items approved and awaiting a review. One recommendation I have is to come up with a list of the things you dislike being mentioned in a review, add that list to the message you send when you approve reviewers. Myself I'd be happy to comply with such things for just one review, if asked.
  • Yeah, well a lot of sellers are crazy. I myself don't mind a few critical reviews..helps customers pass the bs meter test. Not everyone is going to like your product.

    But you are right, it is a good idea to give tips in the emails we send out.
  • edited October 2015
    Is the title in the product review really that bad? I saw some example reviewers a while back (on another site, I think), where some of the top reviewers had at the top "This review is for:" then gave the title of the listing, then their review. I thought it might be helpful in some cases where people are obviously writing reviews on the wrong product page. I could be totally off base here, and any input would be appreciated!!

    As far as listing what comes with the product, if there's something that's included in the purchase, for example a company who sends me an ebook about the uses for the essential oil I just received, I'll mention that. Or an apple corer that came with a little cleaning brush. Those things I'll mention because they're nice little extras that may have gotten buried in the product listing. And for photos, I've been doing a lot of beauty product reviews lately, and I try to do at least 3 photos...one of the front of the packaging, and one showing the ingredients or directions, and one of the actual product (a swatch test or something similar). More or less photos depending on the product, if it needs them or whatnot.

    I've been working on updating some of my reviews, improving wording, taking better photos, etc., so any feedback helps :)
  • I mean, it is just too wordy and redundant. The review is already on the listing, we know what you are reviewing. Your example isn't too terrible, but a lot of reviewers mention the title, like right in the middle of the review...as if we didn't know what product they were talking about. When a lot of reviewers are doing it on a product, it just looks bad. I guess some are trying to boost their word count because they dont know what to say for simple products, and I get that, but yeah...

    One to two sentence reviews are fine sometimes. They look natural and get straight to the point. I see a lot of reviewers writing like 3 paragraphs for, example, a dog bowl.
  • I think if you were to give a list of how to write a review you would find even more generic reviews and even less effort put in by some people. Not saying it is a totally bad idea but I can see the down sides to it also. I try to write reviews with lots of personal experience and how the product pertains to my life and why it is useful or not. I do sometimes state what the product comes with because sometimes that gets lost in the initial reading of a product. I take pictures when it makes sense to or when asked and I do my best to write a quality review and always give the product the time it deserves.

    As most reviewers here I take my responsibility to sellers seriously. If something is not working or is faulty I speak with the seller and try to resolve this rather than give them a 2 star review which could very well be unjust. I agree with Christy most sellers wouldn't even give us a look in if we did short reviews lots of 3 stars and no pictures.

    It's a difficult one. But I do understand what you are saying and I do think it could grow into a good thing but it would take a lot of fine tuning otherwise people will just copy, paste and go down the list of what they should do for a review rather than being a true reviewer.

  • This is a horrible, hilarious idea. I say we go for it!

    You realize that Amazon's logistics are partial to some of the things you are suggesting reviewers not do, right?

    Don't pick reviewers who you think are crappy. Bam, problem solved. You're welcome.
  • FenixFenix ✭✭
    edited October 2015
    @Kati Schlipf

    Most sellers appreciate those things included in the review.

    But see, that's the problem. Contrary to the sellers belief the content of the reviews are not acutally for the seller benefit. The whole concept of a review is to help potential buyers decide if this is a product that they want and regurgitating descriptions tells me nothing as a potential buyer that I did not already read. When followed by the disclaimer however it absolutely dsoes come across as a whole bunch of purchased reviews.

    have to review the product we received, including what was with our order. It also shows we actually used the product, and didn't review it unopened thus reselling it.

    No we don't. We have to give our actual experience and impression of the product. Think of yourself as a potential buyer. If you have already read the sellers description, of what use is a regurgitated version of it? I want to know if the product lives up to that description, what worked, what annoys the hell out of it about you because those are the things that make you decide if you actually want to buy something. For instance, I bought a 15oz mug. There are 20 regurgitated reviews of that say it's a 15oz mug. You know what... it's does not hold 15 oz. It doesn't even hold 14oz. It's a 13oz mug that is awkward as hell to hold. Of all of the reviews only TWO people actually talk about how awkward and the thing is to actually use. So how exactly are those other reviews helpful. They say exactly what the seller wants to hear, the just don't give any information that's actually useful to the buyer. If I had paid $20 for that mug it would be on it's way back to Amazon right now and that absolutely does not help the seller.

    You are not being paid as a marketing consultant or a copywriter. You are being given a discount on a product to honestly review the PRODUCT, not the packaging or the ingredients or quite frankly to please the seller. At it's core the review system exists to help buyers decide where they should spend their money. Positive reviews and reviews that are voted as helpful and then converted to sales help the seller but the review actually has to help the buyer if it's going to have real results.
  • I sometimes describe what comes with a product, a carrying case for example, or extra parts that were included. Sometimes I do this because I didn't realize those things were included, sometimes I do it because the little extra thing was better quality than I was expecting. However, I sometimes tell a little bit about what was included with the main item because there isn't much to say about that items. A pair of tweezers for example...

    (what is actually going through my mind when I think of tweezers)
    Yep, that's a pair of tweezers... They're for plucking little hairs... They work just like every other pair of tweezers on the planet work... Yep, tweezers. Um... Tweezers.

    So I go into dumb little details of what's included, if they are made well and a little description of how it worked for me personally. Do I want to go into personal details about myself for product reviews, it's kind of embarrassing to tell everyone about a 'lady mustache' or that I wanted to try an acne treatment. But OH WELL, because I have to write something. So, Here are some tweezers, here is what was included, here was my 'problem' and here is how the tweezers helped.

    If sellers don't like that kind of review then they won't pick me and there won't be any problems.
  • edited October 2015
    What makes me roll my eyes, giggle, and shake my head all at the same time is that some of the best advice I have found on the interwebs said this:
    When you are looking at a product on Amazon to buy, look at the three-star reviews. Why? Because the reviewer who gives it 3 stars is not going to be someone who thinks it's the absolute best thing that's even better than the next best thing since sliced bread. It's not going to be someone who got their panties in a twist because the little red yo-yo they bought didn't mow their yard. It's going to be someone who used the product, saw that it had some really good features but a drawback or two, and gave their honest opinion.

    Now, these "reviewers" I'm talking about aren't review hobbyists like ourselves who get discounted products in exchange for a review, they're just the average John or Jane Smith who bought the product and decided to be considerate of the next consumer, and leave a review with their impressions. So I'm not saying that this is what we should aim for, I'm not saying "let's all give 3-star reviews." I'm just saying that as a consumer, I'm more likely to skip over 5-star reviews to some that are going to give me a more accurate impression of the product.

    This is just what pops into my head whenever I see people talking about how important it is to *only* get 5-star reviews (not referring to anyone on this thread), and that 3 and 4 star reviews are the absolute end to the seller's career.
  • I find this post and your point ."...Just give an honest opinion and don't make it sound like an informercial...." And "....Sending pointers telling reviewers how to leave a review...."

    This is Everything that would make my reviews and other reviewers, reviews, not honest and biased...!

    I am not reviewing sellers products as an employed copywriter.

    If I want to include XYZ in my "Honest" review then I will do.
    And if I want to include 20 Pictures I will do that too....

    I hope if you see my name, which is the same on here and AMZ requesting your products that you choose to pass on my review request.

    My reviews are the same for products I buy on Amazon and I will not change the way I write a review for a seller, you are not paying me. I am not your employee.

    I am testing and then honestly reviewing. That's all..!!
    Posts like this are exactly what are pushing me to stopping reviewing through AMZ.

    I can't be only one annoyed by this...??? Can I...???

    Just because I am sent a sellers product for free or at a discount, this does not mean I can be dictated to, by a seller. Does it...!!! No it doesn't..!!!

    My only concern is to be helpful to customers... I'm not concerned about writting a Review that ticks all the sellers boxes.
    Helpful reviews = Helped Customers = Customers Making Informed Choices About Where They Do Or Do Not Spend Their Money...!!!
  • misspinky said:

    I find this post and your point ."...Just give an honest opinion and don't make it sound like an informercial...." And "....Sending pointers telling reviewers how to leave a review...."

    I am testing and then honestly reviewing. That's all..!!
    Posts like this are exactly what are pushing me to stopping reviewing through AMZ.

    I can't be only one annoyed by this...??? Can I...???

    Just because I am sent a sellers product for free or at a discount, this does not mean I can be dictated to, by a seller. Does it...!!! No it doesn't..!!!

    My only concern is to be helpful to customers... I'm not concerned about writting a Review that ticks all the sellers boxes.
    Helpful reviews = Helped Customers = Customers Making Informed Choices About Where They Do Or Do Not Spend Their Money...!!!

    Exactly. I wish I could like this 600 times.

    If you want to "train" a reviewer, then spend money on a PR team and stop being cheap.

  • The thing is, those types of reviews are NOT helpful to customers...that is my point. They are cheesy, lack content, and can be easily replaced with any other product. A lot of reviews consist of a many words, but don't say anything at all. If you are honest with yourself, you will have to admit this.
  • I don't think one or two sentence reviews are 'fine' if the sentence is almost entirely made up of the 'I got this free for review' disclaimer. That is happening more and more often on amazon and it looks terrible. And if someone lists all the items included with the product, so what? At least they didn't stiff you and take the code and not review at all. What if something was missing or something was added in that wasn't in the listing? Besides, I've noticed that a lot of sellers aren't using bullet points in their descriptions. People tend to not read a wall of text that isn't broken up in some way. Sellers and reviewers should pay attention to that kind of formatting.

    One paragraph is good for a review. 4-5 sentences, not including the disclaimer.

    Sellers should always check out their reviewers before they approve them. It looks like different sellers prefer different kinds of reviews. Long and wordy, or short reviews. Whatever. You don't have to 'train' anyone. Just do your homework before you start throwing codes out at random and only choose the type of reviewers you actually want.
  • Thank you Allen_H I thought I was going mad.!!!

    Loops77... I have to disagree with you unfortunately. I am being honest, I think I have made that quite clear my opinion on this.

    You are entitled to your opinion and I am entitled to mine.

    I'm not trying to be funny with you, just Maybe you are looking at it from a sellers point of view and not from a customers point of view. You maybe looking at what will sell you more products.
    I'm looking at it from helping customers if they should or shouldn't spend their hard earned money on something.

    All of my reviews are exactly the same format
    I buy items nearly everyday on Amazon myself and leave reviews for them too.

    So I spend a lot of time reading reviews from other customers, the one's where they photograph and give detailed reviews are the most helpful and I always hit the helpful
    Button. I'm not speaking for every reviewer or customer. Im just giving my own opinion.
  • Tina_Goff

    ..."Besides, I've noticed that a lot of sellers aren't using bullet points in their descriptions. People tend to not read a wall of text that isn't broken up in some way"....

    Totally agree on your point.

    I have seen this alot too or what's included isn't shown on the advert
    So letting people know what they will actually receive is helpful in my honest opinion.
  • ZetaZeta ✭✭
    edited October 2015
    http://i.imgur.com/lmvGoYk.jpg

    Another reason why reviewers state what the product does in their reviews. If you ever worked a retail job you will know this "customers are stupid".
  • hahaha @Zeta They've probably got 47 apps running in the background, but they are too dumb to know how to turn them off. Blaming the screen protector! :D
  • @misspinky Yep, I have also seen 3 or more products listed on 1 page and all of them are different, but the seller doesn't bother to write a description for each version of the product.
  • Then there's the opposite end of the spectrum...

    I literally just got finished reviewing a product (fashion accessory) that had 5 bullet points in the description:
    • Women and girls - one size
    • Elastic on bottom, strong cute [product]
    • 5 colors
    • Size adjustable
    • Recommended ages: 5 years to adult
    And that was all.

    What I received was totally different than what I expected to get. I mean it looked the same as the pictures, but that was about it! That wasn't a review, that was a product description...

    Maybe start another thread, "Any way to train the sellers to write better product descriptions?" I mean if there were decent pictures to begin with, I wouldn't have to spend an hour of my time trying to take and edit the 8 pictures that takes to properly show the product!! (That one review took me 3+ hours to take pictures, select/edit photos, and try to explain the product so someone else would know what to expect.)
  • Tina_Goff said:

    (what is actually going through my mind when I think of tweezers)
    Yep, that's a pair of tweezers... They're for plucking little hairs... They work just like every other pair of tweezers on the planet work... Yep, tweezers. Um... Tweezers.

    LOL! And that's what you should say. It's like reviewing Amino Supplements. There is really no way of knowing if your BCAA tablets or Performance Aminos are anything other than other than diluted and flavored battery acid but damn if I don't keep requesting and paying for them and then sit at my keybooard a couple nights a week thinking... "Mildly palatable battery acid" is probably not what the seller is looking for (even if it is what anyone that uses it thinks) so what the hell do I say now?

    I keep getting emails offering me running/travel money belts. I can't bring myself to say yes since I don't think "Hey look, the fanny pack is back in a minimalist design...now if only I could find a good deal on sock garters" is what those nice people offering to send me a free want are looking for.

    I think I actually have an item I reviewed with the title of "It doesn't suck" because there was no other true and honest thing I could think of to say. The hilarious thing is that people found it helpful.

    I am moving more and more towards the mindset of ... if I'm standing in a store with this in my hand and someone asks me what I think of it, what would I say to them as my review mindset. And believe me, if someone asked me about tweezers, I would say exactly what you were thinking.

  • Fenix said:



    I keep getting emails offering me running/travel money belts. I can't bring myself to say yes since I don't think "Hey look, the fanny pack is back in a minimalist design...now if only I could find a good deal on sock garters" is what those nice people offering to send me a free want are looking for.


    I just snorted out loud when I read that! My pet rabbit jumped and is now giving me a death glare for startling her! haha

    I have actually reviewed one of those belt things, and I made a point to say that it was flat, unlike a 'fanny pack', and you could hide it under your shirt. Other than being able to hide it easily, and the fact that no one can pick pocket you if all of your money is wrapped around your belly, there weren't any other positives to talk about that I could find.

    So, yeah. Sometimes I'm just going to list items included, sizing, or good packaging in my review. Trivialities for novelty items. Isn't that the point of novelty items anyway, that they are bought on a whim and kind of trivial.
  • edited October 2015
    Tina_Goff said:

    I keep getting emails offering me running/travel money belts. I can't bring myself to say yes since I don't think "Hey look, the fanny pack is back in a minimalist design...now if only I could find a good deal on sock garters" is what those nice people offering to send me a free want are looking for.

    I reviewed one of those...and talked about how cool it was to be able to carry my phone around with me while I do chores, and since it's waterproof, I don't have to worry about ruining my phone when I have a "moment" and manage to completely soak myself with the kitchen sprayer lol

    I got those bunion toe-separator things and my review is going to be whether or not they make my pointe shoes more comfortable :)
  • Are you quoting me or Fenix @quirkybeeper ?

    I've reviewed one of those waterproof running belts too so that had a little more to talk about.

    I don't have bunions, so I didn't apply for those toe separator thingys. I stick to things I can actually find a use for. Sounds like you are a dancer, so more power to you if those things work!
  • Oops, meant to quote Fenix...the code came up funky when I used the quote button...I guess my attempt to fix it failed :)

    For those bunion pads, I actually emailed the seller before I ordered and let them know what I'd be using them for and asked if that was ok. Luckily they said yes! I didn't want my ballet-related post to come completely out of left field and leave them wondering why they picked me in the first place!
  • I put the item title because often, sellers have multiple items listed. So I want the buyer to know what item I am actually reviewing. I also start out my reviews with explaining how this product will solve a problem for me. Then go into the details of good and bad. Pros and cons etc.
  • I use the title of the product as the title of the review, I shorten it if it's a really long title to just what the thing is. I do this because I write my reviews in Microsoft Word so I can spell check and put in any edits I might need before posting. I also like to have a word doc. for back up, so I know I've written that review and when I wrote it.
    I get emails from sellers sometimes asking me to review a product I had reviewed a week or more ago. That just shows they use automated emails and aren't really checking who has and hasn't reviewed.
  • What makes me roll my eyes, giggle, and shake my head all at the same time is that some of the best advice I have found on the interwebs said this:

    When you are looking at a product on Amazon to buy, look at the three-star reviews. Why? Because the reviewer who gives it 3 stars is not going to be someone who thinks it's the absolute best thing that's even better than the next best thing since sliced bread. It's not going to be someone who got their panties in a twist because the little red yo-yo they bought didn't mow their yard. It's going to be someone who used the product, saw that it had some really good features but a drawback or two, and gave their honest opinion.



    When I'm buying a product I start with the 1 star review. I want to know what's wrong with it. And I'm smart enough as a consumer to filter out the 'this strawberry lip balm sucks beause i hate strawberries' reviews and read what is really wrong with it. If a dozen people say it made their lips burn.. there might be something to that. If one person says it, maybe that person had a bad reaction. I actually had to give a product a low rating this week beause it made me break out. I contacted the seller first and gave her a heads up.. and she actually said 'go ahead and leave the negative review - honesty is important' That changed my whole attitude about the product. I talked a friend into trying it, they had no reaction, so I gave a middle of the road review - it works, smells great, feels great, but there's a small risk of a reaction. As a buyer if I'd seen that ONE review with that out of loads of positives, I'd asusme the person had an allergic reaction, test the item on the back of my hand before lettibg it anywhere near my face, and that's that.

    I prefer the 3 star reviews for the same reason you just said. They're honest. I also look to see how a seller responds to a 1 or 2 star review. I had a seller harrass me and downvote my review to oblivion because of a 2 star review when pictures showed that their product was obviously crap. As a buyer, if I saw that kind of response, or even if I saw all negative reviews were downvoted that would be my cue to stay FAR away from that seller since they participate in shady business practices. A seller who owns their negative reviews and offers a way to fix the problem or even says 'I'm sorry you didn't like the strawberry flavor of out strawberry lip balm, maybe if you prefer vanilla, you can try one of those instead?' gets my respect for being proactive.

    The 5 star reviews? I ignore.

    So, sellers.. if you want to actually get customers, embrace the loweer star reviews and use them to show your customers that you are a GOOD seller, who will work to get things right. It will help you MORE than 3000 5 star reviews.

  • @jaded: Seller reactions: "we can't hear you, we can't hear you, going for 5-star averages only."

    It is so clear that happens here it is pitiful. Then you get a bunch of crap 5-star reviews that end with "got this in exchange for my honest review." To me, that hurts more than helps. As a buyer I would just laugh and go to the next product.
  • So I am curious (from a reviewers stand point) - what do sellers really want? I leave more 5 star reviews than 3 or 4 stars. I don't put as much "feelings" or "emotions" into the review as other people. I state the facts about the product. Mostly about the quality but not necessarily how I feel about the product. But I think sometimes comparing like products is the best way because there have been plenty of times that I think a product is great and then I get the same/similar product from a different manufacturer or company and the second product is better.

    It does bother me a lot when reviewers copy and paste the description of the product into their review and even when a reviewer will hit "enter" on the keyboard after every sentence - why do reviewers do these things - just to make the review look longer?

    From an Amazon buyer stand point - I do read the reviews before buying a product and will pass on a product if the majority of the reviews are less than 3 stars if the reviews are all pretty consistent in their descriptions. But I ignore the reviews that are 5 stars and so clearly fake it's sad. Some people make it sound like some of these products are as good as someone inventing sliced bread! But sometimes at the end of the day - they're just tweezers. :smile:
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