Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

What does it mean when AMZ instructs you to Study Copywriting?

vpoinde7vpoinde7
edited June 2015 in General
I'm a newcomer and was instructed from AMZ to study copywriting to help me increase my sales. My question is what does it mean to study copywriting and how does it apply to selling on Amazon?

Comments

  • edited June 2015
    Copywriting is the art (or science?) of selling with words. The better you know how to sell with your words, the more you will sell and the better your Amazon listing will convert (and better conversions = higher rankings). Copywriting convinces your potential customers to take action. To purchase.

    Example 1:
    Our product is blue. size 10. $19.99

    A copywriting example:
    Get our # 1 rated product right now for only $19.99. 50% off of its normal price. Its creamy blue finish in the perfect size 10 will satisfy any product lover. Only 15 left in stock so buy now before its too late!!

    That type of stuff. I'm not a good copywriter, so don't follow me. I do hire good ones though, as they make a difference.
  • I noticed there weren’t many posts that delved deeper into copywriting, so I thought I would elaborate on Travis’s point and post approach to copywriting that might make life a bit easier for those a bit newer to copywriting.

    To start I’ll define it in more explicit terms Wikipedia defines copywriting as…

    “Copywriting is written content conveyed through online media and print materials. Copy is content primarily used for the purpose of advertising or marketing. This type of written material is often used to persuade a person or group as well as raise brand awareness.”
    The most important part of that definition is defining its purpose: used to persuade a person or group.

    Hundreds of companies invest thousands of dollars on focus groups, market research, etc to better understand their customer.

    Why?

    So they can better understand how to persuade them to buy their product or service.

    Understanding your audience is THE MOST IMPORTANT to remember when copywriting.

    You don’t have thousands of dollars to spend on your product so what are your options?

    Well tough cookies. Leave now.

    Just kidding. You DON’T need thousands of dollars.

    One option is doing an empathy map.

    http://www.solutionsiq.com/images/Empathy-Map-No-Stickies.png (example)

    With this method you map out who you envision your customer to be, the type of person they are, what they do, what they think, what they feel, their pains, etc.

    Based off of the customer avatar you’ve crafted, you write your copy catering to the person you envision them to be.

    Copyblogger goes into great detail about this: http://www.copyblogger.com/empathy-maps/

    Luckily for us we are selling on Amazon.com so there is a lot less guesswork.

    To find out what type of writing connects with people, you can simply look at the most helpful reviews for your competitors or other products in your space.

    Take this example:
    http://www.amazon.com/DeLonghi-EC702-15-Bar-Pump-Espresso-Stainless/dp/B001CNG7RY/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    Screenshot of review: http://grab.by/NegE

    The top review you see is rated by 1,711 of 1,722 as being a helpful review.

    You have 1700 people telling you they connected to this review and most likely it got them to purchase. (Way better than trying to play fortune teller and guessing, right?)

    If you look more closely, of the 3 most helpful reviews, 2 of them mention the value you get for the price. What’s the takeaway? People aren’t looking for top-of-the-line espresso makers, they are looking for…

    ...a good quality one that will not break the bank.

    There’s your starting point.

    Still stuck? Then let’s go deeper.

    What is important to them? We now know that they are looking for good quality and the headlines for the review say excellent machine.

    So we ask ourselves what makes it an excellent machine? Is it the features? The reliability? Does it print money? (Probably not that last one...)

    Let’s take a closer look at the reviews…
    “The bottom line is that it produces a perfect crema with a rich taste.”

    “the performance of this machine has been flawless. I have not experienced any leaks or problems. I have followed the instructions carefully from the first use, kept it properly cleaned and it has rewarded me with a great cup every day.”

    “It DOES produce a FABULOUS Espresso shot, Cappucino, Latte's, it tastes MUCH better than Starbucks to me and it only took me two attempts to get my technique down to where it's NOT a problem.”

    “All of the above takes me about 5-7 minutes.”
    Main themes: great taste, easy to use, for a great price.

    So now you know your description needs to be focused on conveying to your potential customer how this machine does this for them.

    That's what I would write.

    Let’s take a look at this posts product description and see what they wrote:
    “Enjoy delicious espresso made your way with De'Longhi's pump espresso and cappuccino maker.“

    “create a rich creamy froth achieving perfect drinks every time.”

    “highlights include self-priming operation to eliminate pesky start-up preparation, a unique no-drip design, so you don't have to deal with messy cleanup and a durable, high-quality stainless steel boiler to ensure many years of delicious espresso.”

    “Easily prepare latte and cappuccino with the patented Cappuccino System frother.”
    And it’s easy to see this post has has done exactly that. Every mention of features goes back to relate to the needs and desires of what we determined were important to the customer from the reviews.

    And there you have it. Boom. Your Amazon copywriting cheat.

    Hope it was helpful. Now go out there and use your new powers to seduce some customers into buying your products!
  • I found these top 10 tips for copywriting very useful: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/164812
Sign In or Register to comment.